1. hishaoyulu:

hishaoyulu:

Sorry it isn’t English

reblog!!!

    hishaoyulu:

    hishaoyulu:

    Sorry it isn’t English

    reblog!!!

  2. ladyhistory:

    babelincolns:

    Why didn’t anybody tell me that there’s a Lincoln documentary narrated by David Strathairn on Netflix????

    NO

    NO WAY

    DO NOT LIE TO ME

    had no clue

  3. theream:

    nevver:

    Working on my novel, Cory Arcangel

    anger

    (Source: coryarcangel.com)

  4. Why wouldn’t you have a plaster relief of yourself in your own hallway?

    Why wouldn’t you have a plaster relief of yourself in your own hallway?

  5. (Source: soulpicnic)

  6. Anna Seward, married to Frederick Seward - William’s son and asst Secretary of State. She is holding the fan in the box below her which came from Japan. The artist is Immanuel Leutze, famous for Washington crossing the Delaware and the Signing of the Alaska Purchase.

    Anna Seward, married to Frederick Seward - William’s son and asst Secretary of State. She is holding the fan in the box below her which came from Japan. The artist is Immanuel Leutze, famous for Washington crossing the Delaware and the Signing of the Alaska Purchase.

  7. sexpigeon:

Why do they sell cigarettes in prescription bottles when they clearly don’t fit?

I don’t smoke but this still be funny

    sexpigeon:

    Why do they sell cigarettes in prescription bottles when they clearly don’t fit?

    I don’t smoke but this still be funny

  8. (Source: hotsprite)

  9. Seward and his daughter Fanny (to his Left) and the diplomatic corp in Utica, NY in July 1863.
Seward brought them on a tour of New York State in the aftermath of Gettyburg to drive home to the nations of Europe that the Union was strong with productive power and population, therefore intervention on behalf of the Confederacy was ill advised. It worked.
Standing between Fany and Seward is Baron Edward DeStoekle, the Russian diplomat with whom Seward would negotiate the purchase of Alaska four years later.

BTW - I love how they trotted out a sofa for Seward and the two ladies but every body else had to stand, including snooty Lord Lyons of England. The Prussian minister grabbed a chair cuz what the heck.

    Seward and his daughter Fanny (to his Left) and the diplomatic corp in Utica, NY in July 1863.

    Seward brought them on a tour of New York State in the aftermath of Gettyburg to drive home to the nations of Europe that the Union was strong with productive power and population, therefore intervention on behalf of the Confederacy was ill advised. It worked.

    Standing between Fany and Seward is Baron Edward DeStoekle, the Russian diplomat with whom Seward would negotiate the purchase of Alaska four years later.

    BTW - I love how they trotted out a sofa for Seward and the two ladies but every body else had to stand, including snooty Lord Lyons of England. The Prussian minister grabbed a chair cuz what the heck.

  10. todaysdocument:

Thomas Jefferson’s Account of the Storming of the Bastille, 225 Years ago:

“…in that instant a discharge from the Bastille killed 4 people of those nearest to the deputies. The deputies retired, the people rushed against the place, and almost in an instant were in possession of a fortification, defended by 100 men, of infinite strength, which in other times had stood several regular sieges & had never been taken.”
Letter from Thomas Jefferson, U.S. Minister to France, to John Jay, Secretary of Foreign Affairs, July 19, 1789, reporting on the events in Paris, (page 538)
From the file unit:  Letters from Thomas Jefferson, 1785 - 1789

Appointed U.S. Minister to France in 1785, Thomas Jefferson was in Paris in July 1789 when the French people rose up against their rulers and the first blood was shed in the opening days of the French Revolution. In his letter to Secretary of Foreign Affairs John Jay, Jefferson recounts how a mob stormed the Bastille, took the stash of arms, freed the prisoners, and seized the “Governor” of the Bastille who was then killed and beheaded in the city streets on July 14, 1789.
via Eyewitness: Thomas Jefferson - Onset of the French Revolution, 1789

so awesome

    todaysdocument:

    Thomas Jefferson’s Account of the Storming of the Bastille, 225 Years ago:

    “…in that instant a discharge from the Bastille killed 4 people of those nearest to the deputies. The deputies retired, the people rushed against the place, and almost in an instant were in possession of a fortification, defended by 100 men, of infinite strength, which in other times had stood several regular sieges & had never been taken.”

    Letter from Thomas Jefferson, U.S. Minister to France, to John Jay, Secretary of Foreign Affairs, July 19, 1789, reporting on the events in Paris, (page 538)

    From the file unit:  Letters from Thomas Jefferson, 1785 - 1789

    Appointed U.S. Minister to France in 1785, Thomas Jefferson was in Paris in July 1789 when the French people rose up against their rulers and the first blood was shed in the opening days of the French Revolution. In his letter to Secretary of Foreign Affairs John Jay, Jefferson recounts how a mob stormed the Bastille, took the stash of arms, freed the prisoners, and seized the “Governor” of the Bastille who was then killed and beheaded in the city streets on July 14, 1789.

    via Eyewitness: Thomas Jefferson - Onset of the French Revolution, 1789

    so awesome